• What breed of chickens do you raise?
    • Our meat birds are the Cornish Cross breed of chicken for their quick grow out time, foraging abilities, tender white meat, and large breast size.
    • Our egg laying hens are Golden Buffs, ( a cross between a Rhode Island Red rooster and Sexlink hen ) for their pasture hardiness, aggressive foraging, small frame, and high laying production.

 

  • What do I do with chicken feet?
    • Add chicken feet to your stockpot and end up with an amazingly gelatinous chicken stock! 

 

  • Why do some eggs have 2 yolks?
    • A double-yolked egg occurs when two egg yolks are released into a hen’s oviduct too close together and end up encased within the same shell.  Generally about an hour after an egg is laid, the next yolk is released, but due to hormonal change/imbalance, an overstimulated ovary sometimes misfires and releases the yolk too early.  The shell forms around both yolks and results in a single egg.

 

  • What is a “Spent Hen”? – Spent hens are our 2 year old laying hens that have gone through their second molt and dropped below profitable egg production. These birds are full of flavor, nutrient dense, and wonderful for use in stocks, and pulled meat for things such as chicken salad. They must be cooked low and slow as their meat is tougher do to their age.

 

  • Where do you get your chicks? – We mail order one day old chicks from Welp Hatchery, and Meyer Hatchery. The chicks are shipped via ground in ventilated cardboard boxes to our local post office. We are notified as soon as the chicks arrive and immediately bring them back to our farm brooder where they have plenty of clean water, fresh organic soy-free feed, and warmth from heat lamps.

 

 

  • Why do you choose Soy-Free Grain? 
    • Soy is in everything. It’s an industrial food ingredient. If it comes in a box and it is supposed to be edible then chances are high that soy is on the ingredient list. And the likelihood is that the soy is transgenic, genetically modified. Americans eat more soy than traditional soy consuming cultures. We don’t want soy to be in everything.
      • Soy is high in phytic acid. Monogastric animals like chickens, pigs and humans don’t produce the enzyme phytase. Without phytase, phytic acid can block uptake of vitamins and minerals. Not only is this a waste, but it’s creating pollution problems.
      • Soy is high in phytoestrogens. Our children are entering adolescence earlier and earlier.
      • Soy is high in trypsin inhibitors. Trypsin is an enzyme that helps to break down many different proteins. Inhibition of trypsin contributes to allergies.
    • Learn more about Soy here.

 

  • Why more expensive? – If we plan to run a successful farm, we must strive to be economically viable as well. This means pricing our products at a rate that will keep our business growing into the future.